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Dan

Armour Calculation

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Armour Formula and Damage Reduction Calculations

 

Each piece of armour in Flamefrost has two primary attributes: "Armour" and "Armour Effectiveness".
"Armour" attribute can be described as "how much of your body this particular item covers" and defines the maximum percentage of damage that this item can block (where 15 points of Armour are treated as 1% of damage reduction).
All armour types usually have between 90 to 240 armour points (per each equipped item individually)

"Armour Effectiveness" represent the actual material and endurance of this item, defining the amount of damage that this item can withstand.

For example, a full set of armour (1440 armour points from all equipped parts) can theoretically protect you from approx. 95% incoming damage.
However, if it's made out of cloth its effectiveness will be low (since cloth can be easily torn by any sharp object): let's say that its effectiveness value is 10 (points of damage).
This means that if you're hit by a wooden stick dealing 5 damage, 95% of that damage will be ignored (as 5 is less than 10).
But if a giant dragon hits you for 1,000 damage, the armour effectiveness of your items is so much lower that it's simply going to be ignored (and 100% of the dragon's damage will hit you).

If you'd like to know how the item quality and armour type affects each of these values in more details, let's examine the associated mechanics:

Each item found in the game will have a various amount of armour points and effectiveness, different for each quality level (junk, common, uncommon, rare, legendary).

Different item Quality Levels represent the different Damage Reduction % caps that can be achieved by equipping 6 items awarding armour points (excluding a shield, which is extra).
The combined maximum from the best 6 items of Junk quality items will award approx. 825 points of armour, which is 55% of Damage Reduction.

6 items of Common quality items = 65%
Uncommon = 75%
Rare = 85%
Legendary = 95%

Note: shields have 2x Armour Points, so wearing one is similar to having 2 extra armour slots.
I.e. not wearing shields and equipping a two-handed weapon will award higher damage output, but your armour will be limited by the values listed above.

Average item effectiveness per item level has been calculated using the average melee damage dealt by the world's creatures (non-elite) of the same level.

Item quality and item type define the maximum effectiveness using percentage of the average creature damage.
For example, heavy armour of the Junk quality has an average effectiveness of 80% of the average creature damage (meaning that a full set will block up to 55% of damage, if the damage is slightly below average for this level).

Below is the list of effectiveness percentages (against the average creature damage) per item type, per quality:

Cloth Armour:
Junk = 20% effectiveness
Common = 30% effectiveness
Uncommon = 40% effectiveness
Rare = 50% effectiveness
Legendary = 60% effectiveness

Light Armour:
Junk = 40% effectiveness
Common = 50% effectiveness
Uncommon = 60% effectiveness
Rare = 70% effectiveness
Legendary = 80% effectiveness

Medium Armour:
Junk = 60% effectiveness
Common = 70% effectiveness
Uncommon = 80% effectiveness
Rare = 90% effectiveness
Legendary = 100% effectiveness

Heavy Armour:
Junk = 80% effectiveness
Common = 90% effectiveness
Uncommon = 100% effectiveness
Rare = 120% effectiveness
Legendary = 140% effectiveness

This means that a Legendary Heavy Armour item will be effective at 140% of the average creature damage dealt (40% above average damage).

In other words, having the best possible full set of a Legendary Heavy Armour for level 5 will block 95% of all incoming damage that is average for this creature level, or 40% higher.
If you're fighting an "average" bear of level 5 that deals 100-200 damage (150 being the average for level 5), your set will be effective at 140% of the average damage, which is 210, meaning that all damage of this level 5 bear will be reduced by 95%.

However, attacking a level 6 bear that deals 150 - 250 damage will mean that all damage above 210 will be outside of the armour's effectiveness, and you will start getting armour point penalties reducing the absorbed damage percentage.

Note: for non-physical (elemental) damage, physical armour values (points and effectiveness) will be reduced to 20%, but will still work.
Note #2: armour-related skill points can increase the effectiveness of each equipped armour.

Please let me know if you have any questions or if any additional examples are required.

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Just Making sure I understand this correctly, so I will post two examples just let me know if I am correct on this or not.

 

In this Example I will use a situation at which the armor is greater then the base damage after armor effectiveness is applied: 

You're wearing a FULL set of cloth armor ( 6 pieces at 90 armor each ) coming out to 540 points of Armor. ( 36% Damage Reduction )

The complete set is at a quality of "Rare". ( Rare = 50% effectiveness )

You start combat with a "Tossed Salad" or "Paper Clip" ( Same Level ), who's average base damage is 120 points.

You'd take your "armor effectiveness" (50% in this case)  and take the average base damage (120 point in this case), then take 50% of 120 which is 60.

Since 60 is lower than your 540 points of armor, you'd reduce the damage by 36% of 120 of the base damage, which comes out to 43 points of damage rounded.

 

In this Example I will use a situation a little more complicated but regardless the damage is greater then the armor after the armor effectiveness is applied: 

You're wearing a 3 Piece set of Common Heavy Armour.  ( 240 points of armor each, equaling 720 points of armor ) ( Common = 90% effectiveness )

In addition you're also wearing 2 Pieces of Junk Cloth Armor. (90 points of armor each, equaling 180 points of armor ) ( Junk = 20% effectiveness )

Finally you looted some decent boots so your final piece is Common Medium Armour. ( 180 points of armor each ) ( Common = 70% effectiveness )

With all of your armor on you'd accumulate an Armor Effectiveness value of 63% rounded and a Armor value of 1080 points.

You begin combat with a "Supreme chinchilla" (Same Level), who's average base damage is 5,000 points.

You'd take your "armor effectiveness" (63% in this case)  and take the average base damage (5,000 point in this case), then take 63% of 5,000 which is 3150.

Since 3,150 is much greater than your Armor of 1,080 ( HERE is the ultimate question ) do you take the full 5,000 points of damage!?

Or would you take a reduced amount of damage? ( If so, how is that calculated? )

Would it be like this?:

 Your Armor effectiveness would take into effect the 63% of the 5,000 points of damage, Subtracting your 1080 points of Armor from the 3,150. ( Leaving 2070 )

Then the remaining 37% ( 1850 Damage) points of base damage would add the 2070 point equaling 3,920.

End result in this theory you'd take 3,920 points of damage instead of the full 5,000.

 

I am generally curious about this, and would greatly appropriate some feed back

Thank you

~ Azal

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Hi Azal,

Thanks for your examples, I can now see a couple of flaws in my original explanation!
However, you are really close!

In your second example, you are absolutely correct in the way "Armour" values are totalled (720 from common + 180 from junk + 180 from common = 1080, i.e. 72% damage reduction), but there are two things about the effectiveness I should mention:

1) "Armour Effectiveness" will actually appear on each item as a numeric value, representing the damage amount (e.g. "Armour Effectiveness: 3000").
Percentages that I listed in the original post are an approximate guide that illustrate the ratio of effectiveness between each quality, and how this compares to the other types (light, heavy).
I.e. you won't actually see any percentages in the game, I've used the % of the creature damage as I thought it would be easier to explain the ratio than if I used the actual damage numbers.

But the Armour Effectiveness does not reduce the incoming damage (only the Armour value does), it simply shows what damage is the limit before your "Armour" value starts degrading.

2) When I mentioned the "average creature damage", I should have clarified that it's the "average damage for all creatures in the world of this level".
I.e. it's not the average damage that your "Tossed Salad" deals on level 1, it's the average damage between "Tossed Salad", "Paper Clip", "Sick Kitten" and a "Dragon Egg" of level 1 (I can't believe the names we're using... just in case someone's wondeirng: these are *not* the real enemies in Flamefrost! :)).

For example, if the "Sick Kitten" and the "Dragon Egg" deal 10 damage, while the "Tossed Salad" and "Paper Clip" - 100 damage, the average creature damage on level 1 is 55.
According to my effectiveness guide, you are likely to find cloth armour on level 1 that would have somewhere around 27 points of effectiveness (50% of the 50 average damage).
So wearing a full set of armour with 27 Armour Effectiveness and 540 points of Armour (36% Damage Reduction from your Tossed Salad example) your damage reduction of 36% will always work against a Kitten and an Egg (as 10 damage is less than 27), and their incoming damage will be reduced by 36% (i.e. 10 - 3).

However, when the Salad hits you for 100 damage (which is greater than 27), your Armour's Damage Reduction will be reduced to 0% (when your average Armour Effectiveness is 27, the Armour value will start going down on 28+ damage and will completely disappear on 27 x2, i.e. 54 damage).

Let's review your Supreme Chinchilla example:
We know that it deals 5,000 damage and let's assume that all creatures of the chinchilla's level deal 5,000 damage, so it's the actual average for that level.
Assuming that you have an average Armour Effectiveness of 63% we can estimate that your actual Armour Effectiveness value is 3150 damage.
With your Armour of 1080 bringing 72% damage reduction to the table, we get the following:
a) if the Chinchilla hits you for 3,000 damage it will be reduced by 72% (you will receive only 840 damage). 
b) if the Chinchilla scores a critical dealing 6300 (200% of your armour effectiveness) you will receive all of it, as your armour can't handle that massive damage.
c) if the Chinchilla hits you for 5,000 damage, your Armour will block roughly 14% of the damage (5,000 is 1,850 points greater than your effectiveness, and 1850 is 58% out of the maximum 3150, i.e. the final damage reduction from Armour is: 72 - 58 = 14%)

I think this is it! 
I hope this makes a little more sense now (please let me know if it doesn't)!

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Hey Dan, sorry for bumping this at one year, but I still found it a little confusing and wanted to make sure I had it right.  Plus, I figured out the formula and wanted to share that.

 Okay, so there are really only two numbers that matter on my Armour spec sheet: Armour and Effectiveness.  

 

Armour tells me how much damage is being taken off of the hit.

15 points of armour = 1% of the attack's damage being blocked. 

 

Effectiveness tells me how high an attack can be before it starts making my armour less effective, or eventually useless.

When an attack is equal or below my effectiveness rating, my armour's damage reduction rating is applied to all of the attack's damage.  When the attack is above my effectiveness rating, some of the attack's damage does not get my armour's damage reduction rating applied to it and is considered unblockable.

 

My armour  and effectiveness ratings for my character are found by adding all of the armour and effectiveness ratings on the gear he is currently wearing.  When I am wearing a shield, I add its armour and effectiveness twice.

In a formula:

A = .01(Armour/15) = How much damage is being blocked

E = Effectiveness = How high the damage can be before some or all of it becomes unblockable

D = Damage of the attack made on you

Damage actually done to you = D - (E - (D - E)) + (1 - A(E - (D - E)))

 

The item's durability, the quality of the item and the item's level all went into creating its armour and effectiveness ratings, so you can actually compare a piece of Legendary Medium Armour to a piece of Uncommon Heavy Armour just by comparing those two ratings - no other math involved.

If all of this was correct, I may post back here (or edit this post) with some numbers on whether it is better to go with higher armour ratings or higher effectiveness ratings.  Right now, I am assuming that the safest thing to do is not to play favourites, but also always check to see if this new piece of armour will get you the extra 1% or not.

Edited by Hyperion
Yypos
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18 hours ago, Hyperion said:

Hey Dan, sorry for bumping this at one year, but I still found it a little confusing and wanted to make sure I had it right.  Plus, I figured out the formula and wanted to share that.

 Okay, so there are really only two numbers that matter on my Armour spec sheet: Armour and Effectiveness.  

 

Armour tells me how much damage is being taken off of the hit.

15 points of armour = 1% of the attack's damage being blocked. 

 

Effectiveness tells me how high an attack can be before it starts making my armour less effective, or eventually useless.

When an attack is equal or below my effectiveness rating, my armour's damage reduction rating is applied to all of the attack's damage.  When the attack is above my effectiveness rating, some of the attack's damage does not get my armour's damage reduction rating applied to it and is considered unblockable.

 

My armour  and effectiveness ratings for my character are found by adding all of the armour and effectiveness ratings on the gear he is currently wearing.  When I am wearing a shield, I add its armour and effectiveness twice.

In a formula:

A = .01(Armour/15) = How much damage is being blocked

E = Effectiveness = How high the damage can be before some or all of it becomes unblockable

D = Damage of the attack made on you

Damage actually done to you = D - (E - (D - E)) + (1 - A(E - (D - E)))

 

The item's durability, the quality of the item and the item's level all went into creating its armour and effectiveness ratings, so you can actually compare a piece of Legendary Medium Armour to a piece of Uncommon Heavy Armour just by comparing those two ratings - no other math involved.

If all of this was correct, I may post back here (or edit this post) with some numbers on whether it is better to go with higher armour ratings or higher effectiveness ratings.  Right now, I am assuming that the safest thing to do is not to play favourites, but also always check to see if this new piece of armour will get you the extra 1% or not.

at late game, every class can cap out at 95% reduction, by getting gear with over 200 armor, ALWAYS go for max effectiveness once you reach that threshold

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3 hours ago, Tanzer said:

at late game, every class can cap out at 95% reduction, by getting gear with over 200 armor, ALWAYS go for max effectiveness once you reach that threshold

Thanks for the advice, Tanzer! That makes sense and I'm betting it will be a big help to know that, going into the EP for the first time. :ph34r:

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Hi Dan! I was hoping you could answer some questions about EDR (elemental damage resistance).

For cloth armor, the EDR seems to be 50%

For full light it seems to be 40%

Since the class that can see these stats in game can't wear medium or heavy armor, could you tell us what the EDR of a full medium or full heavy set of armor might be?

 

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2 hours ago, Novarion said:

Hi Dan! I was hoping you could answer some questions about EDR (elemental damage resistance).

For cloth armor, the EDR seems to be 50%

For full light it seems to be 40%

Since the class that can see these stats in game can't wear medium or heavy armor, could you tell us what the EDR of a full medium or full heavy set of armor might be?

Yup, it's a fairly predictable 30% for Medium and 20% for Heavy Armour. :) 

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On 5/26/2017 at 4:09 AM, Dan said:

Yup, it's a fairly predictable 30% for Medium and 20% for Heavy Armour. :) 

is the elemental defense a % of ARMOR or % of effectiveness? if its armor, its weird. because a vindicator can increase their armor so high that the 20% would be higher than the 50% of cloth

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IF I remember rightly from Norion's playtesting it was armour.  The bit of math I did seemed to indicate that the best armour against elemental magics was light armour, with cloth in second.  This was without taking any special abilities into account, just the straight armour and average effectiveness guides in the op.

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