Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'armour'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Flamefrost Legacy
    • News & Announcements
    • General Discussions
    • Guides and Tutorials
    • Events & Competitions
    • The Great Faction War
    • Bug Reports
    • Off Topic
    • Trading Post

Calendars

  • Community Calendar

Found 2 results

  1. A little guide on how to create your own items. There are 4 professions that you can choose from if you want to create armour/weapons of your own. To create an item using any of the professions above you'd need: A Blueprint can be looted from enemies product of Disenchanting** A State Capsule Gem - obtained from enchanted lakes via Conjuration* needs to be charged as part of the Disenchanting** (optional: for common, uncommon, rare, legendary items only) A Container Carpentry: Treated Timber Neem Seed Oil - can be found in any Alchemy shop Wood - obtained from woodcutting camps via Woodworking*** Tailoring: Textile - can be found at any Clothing Merchant Leather Working: Pelt - can be looted from enemies (wolves/bears/etc) Blacksmithing: Ingot Charcoal - obtained from mines via Mining*** Ore(s) - obtained from mines via Mining*** * See "Created by Phemia Silverstar" Part 2** See "Created by Phemia Silverstar" Part 3*** Simple crafts, needs at least 1 skill point to start.
  2. Armour Formula and Damage Reduction Calculations Each piece of armour in Flamefrost has two primary attributes: "Armour" and "Armour Effectiveness". "Armour" attribute can be described as "how much of your body this particular item covers" and defines the maximum percentage of damage that this item can block (where 15 points of Armour are treated as 1% of damage reduction). All armour types usually have between 90 to 240 armour points (per each equipped item individually) "Armour Effectiveness" represent the actual material and endurance of this item, defining the amount of damage that this item can withstand. For example, a full set of armour (1440 armour points from all equipped parts) can theoretically protect you from approx. 95% incoming damage. However, if it's made out of cloth its effectiveness will be low (since cloth can be easily torn by any sharp object): let's say that its effectiveness value is 10 (points of damage). This means that if you're hit by a wooden stick dealing 5 damage, 95% of that damage will be ignored (as 5 is less than 10). But if a giant dragon hits you for 1,000 damage, the armour effectiveness of your items is so much lower that it's simply going to be ignored (and 100% of the dragon's damage will hit you). If you'd like to know how the item quality and armour type affects each of these values in more details, let's examine the associated mechanics: Each item found in the game will have a various amount of armour points and effectiveness, different for each quality level (junk, common, uncommon, rare, legendary). Different item Quality Levels represent the different Damage Reduction % caps that can be achieved by equipping 6 items awarding armour points (excluding a shield, which is extra). The combined maximum from the best 6 items of Junk quality items will award approx. 825 points of armour, which is 55% of Damage Reduction. 6 items of Common quality items = 65% Uncommon = 75% Rare = 85% Legendary = 95% Note: shields have 2x Armour Points, so wearing one is similar to having 2 extra armour slots. I.e. not wearing shields and equipping a two-handed weapon will award higher damage output, but your armour will be limited by the values listed above. Average item effectiveness per item level has been calculated using the average melee damage dealt by the world's creatures (non-elite) of the same level. Item quality and item type define the maximum effectiveness using percentage of the average creature damage. For example, heavy armour of the Junk quality has an average effectiveness of 80% of the average creature damage (meaning that a full set will block up to 55% of damage, if the damage is slightly below average for this level). Below is the list of effectiveness percentages (against the average creature damage) per item type, per quality: Cloth Armour: Junk = 20% effectiveness Common = 30% effectiveness Uncommon = 40% effectiveness Rare = 50% effectiveness Legendary = 60% effectiveness Light Armour: Junk = 40% effectiveness Common = 50% effectiveness Uncommon = 60% effectiveness Rare = 70% effectiveness Legendary = 80% effectiveness Medium Armour: Junk = 60% effectiveness Common = 70% effectiveness Uncommon = 80% effectiveness Rare = 90% effectiveness Legendary = 100% effectiveness Heavy Armour: Junk = 80% effectiveness Common = 90% effectiveness Uncommon = 100% effectiveness Rare = 120% effectiveness Legendary = 140% effectiveness This means that a Legendary Heavy Armour item will be effective at 140% of the average creature damage dealt (40% above average damage). In other words, having the best possible full set of a Legendary Heavy Armour for level 5 will block 95% of all incoming damage that is average for this creature level, or 40% higher. If you're fighting an "average" bear of level 5 that deals 100-200 damage (150 being the average for level 5), your set will be effective at 140% of the average damage, which is 210, meaning that all damage of this level 5 bear will be reduced by 95%. However, attacking a level 6 bear that deals 150 - 250 damage will mean that all damage above 210 will be outside of the armour's effectiveness, and you will start getting armour point penalties reducing the absorbed damage percentage. Note: for non-physical (elemental) damage, physical armour values (points and effectiveness) will be reduced to 20%, but will still work. Note #2: armour-related skill points can increase the effectiveness of each equipped armour. Please let me know if you have any questions or if any additional examples are required.
×